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Year 5 Assembly.

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Year 5- Please keep practising for our assembly next week!

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On Friday Year 5/6 were visited by Steve Clifford, a famous author. They had the opportunity to ask questions about being an author as well as enjoying some of his stories. All the children really enjoyed their writing workshop with Steve!

Cleaning up our streets!

Investigating the impact of WW1 on Plymouth. A visit to Ford Park Cemetery.

We are so proud of our dancing champ!

We are so proud of our dancing champ! 1

Delicious WW1 trench cake

Delicious WW1 trench cake 1
Delicious WW1 trench cake 2
Delicious WW1 trench cake 3
Delicious WW1 trench cake 4

WW1 art inspired by Murhead Bone

World War One even changed children's games. In the autumn of 1917, when conkers fell from horse chestnut trees, children went out and collected them - not to play with, but to help with the war.

Chemicals from conkers were used in factories, to make a substance called cordite. Cordite was an ingredient in explosive shells and bullets.

Posters were put up in schools, encouraging children to gather conkers. Boy Scout leaders helped organise collections.

The conkers were sent by train to top-secret factories at Holton Heath in Dorset and King's Lynn in Norfolk. Around 3,000 tonnes of conkers were collected by Britain's children in 1917.

The plan wasn't a great success. Conkers were a poor source of acetone, the chemical needed to make cordite. In the end, piles of unused conkers were just left to rot!

WW1 conker investigation

Ordering the planets

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